BMI Is Misleading As A Measurement of Health

Last Updated: Feb. 9, 2015, 6:15 pm EST

By Finessa Bedoun

BMI is not an accurate measurement of overall health.

la-sci-sn-bmi-does-not-measure-health-20160204-001(Wang Zhide / Getty Images)

The findings from a recent UCLA study have concluded that using Body Mass Index calculations as a measurement of health are misleading and that many perfectly healthy people are being labeled as obese because of their BMI numbers.

A person’s Body mass index can be calculated by dividing their weight in kilograms by the square of the person’s height in meters. According to an article in the LA Times, “researchers have begun to suspect that people with so-called “healthy” BMIs can be very unhealthy, and those with high BMIs can actually be in very good shape.”

According to an article in the LA Times, A team of UCLA researchers analyzed data from thousands of individuals “to find out whether BMI correlated with actual markers of health.” The team “looked at blood pressure, triglycerides, cholesterol, glucose, insulin resistance and C-reactive protein data.” The team found that “nearly half of the overweight people and 29% of obese people were, from a metabolic standpoint, quite healthy, while more than 30% of individuals with ‘normal’ weights were metabolically unhealthy.”

You can find more information about BMI on the National Institutes of Health website and more information about this story on Fox News, Newser and the LA Times.